World Skydiving Day Record

World Skydiving Day Record

WHAT is World Skydiving Day? A celebration of the sport of skydiving! The goal is to have the most skydives completed in a single day, WORLDWIDE. Every jump you do on July 13, 2024 counts toward the record! All jump types count: tandems, student jumps, hop n’ pops, fun jumps, high-pulls, etc.

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Skydiving Licenses: Explained

Skydiving Licenses Explained. Skydivers geeking the camera before exiting the plane

Becoming a skydiver starts with achieving a United States Parachute Association Skydiving “A” License, but that’s only the beginning. There are 4 skydiving licenses and multiple ratings that can be achieved as a skydiver. Each of those licenses and ratings requires certain skills and offers specific privileges. In this blog we will explain each of the USPA Skydiving Licenses and Ratings.

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Skydiving: A Weather-Dependent Sport

It’s probably not surprising that skydiving is a weather-dependent sport. Some weather conditions can create increased risks when skydiving. In this blog we will discuss which weather conditions have an impact on your jump and why.

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Skydiving License FAQs

How long does it take to get a skydiving license? Licensing programs are self-paced, so the time it takes to become licensed can vary greatly from student to student. The more you commit yourself to the endeavor, the faster you’ll become licensed. Some students achieve a license in as little as a week or 2! However, the average student completes their skydiving licensing program within about 2 months.

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Becoming a Tandem Skydiving Instructor

Tandem instructor gives two thumbs up during a skydive

They say, “Do something you love and you’ll never work a day in your life.” The sentiment is nice, but the reality is, if you really love something- you work hard for it. Professional skydiving instructors have done a lot to get where they are. Just because skydiving is fun doesn’t mean it isn’t also hard work. So, what does it take to become a tandem skydiving instructor? Read on to learn about the training, prerequisites, pros and cons to becoming a tandem instructor.

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Skydiving Safety Day

Spring is a special time of year for skydivers, especially in the Midwest. We start preparing to take to the skies again after a long, winter hibernation. At Skydive Midwest, we start jumping in late March or early April. There’s lots to do to prepare for another season of 7-days-a-week skydiving. One of the most important things we do before resuming jump operations is host Safety Day.

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Skydiving Tandem Equipment Explained

Tandem skydiver screams right after exiting the plane

If you’re thinking about doing a tandem skydive, you might have some questions about the gear that is going to be used during your jump. We pride ourselves on jumping equipment built by the most respected manufacturers in the industry. In this blog, learn all about the magic backpack that’s going to take you to the skies- as tandem skydiving equipment is explained.

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Do I have to do a Tandem Skydive first?

Skydiving student smiles at camera in free fall

Our most adventurous customers often want to know what it takes to jump out solo. If you’re a go-getter wanting to know how many jumps before you can skydive alone, if tandem skydives are required and how to get from tandem jumper to licensed skydiver going solo– read on.
Do I have to do a tandem skydive first? It depends. While the United State Parachute Association (USPA) does not require any tandem skydives prior to starting a solo licensing program, each skydiving center can set their own policies and requirements.

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What if my Parachute doesn’t open?

tandem skydiver surprised by parachute opening

This is one of the most frequently asked questions among tandem students. It is a reasonable thing to ask before throwing yourself out of an airplane. Here’s everything you may (or may not) want to know about what happens if your parachute doesn’t open or “malfunctions”.

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What is an Automatic Activation Device?

Skydiver with parachute opening

An AAD is a small microprocessor that monitors a jumper’s speed and altitude during a skydive. It does this by measuring changes in barometric pressure. If a jumper is still traveling at freefall speeds when they reach the minimum deployment altitude for safety, the device is designed to automatically deploy the reserve parachute. A small pyrotechnic charge triggers a cutter, which severs the closing loop that keeps the reserve parachute contained.

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